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The Benefits of Bone Broth

DIGESTIVE NEWS & REVIEW:

By Columnist Ange Sinclair – Founder of Digestive Detective:

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Photo credit: Beginning of Broth via photopin (license)

Bone broth has been a staple in traditional diets for decades and it uses every part of the animal; bones, marrow, skin, feet, tendons and ligaments.  It is nutrient dense, richly flavoured, easy to digest and assists the body in healing.

In addition, bone broth is a rich source of gelatine and full of healing amino acids such as glycine, proline and glutamine.  It also is high in minerals such as calcium, magnesium and phosphorus which are beneficial to teeth, hair, skin and nails. The amino acids proline and glycine heal and strengthen connective tissues.  They also support good digestion. Let’s look at these elements in greater detail.

Glycine

Glycine promotes hydrochloric acid production which is vital for digestion and good health.  Illnesses such as heartburn (reflux), osteoporosis, candida, skin conditions (such as eczema, acne and dermatitis), food allergies and rheumatoid arthritis are all linked to low hydrochloric acid.

Proline

Proline is needed in the production of collagen and cartilage.  It keeps muscles and joints flexible and can also help us prevent wrinkles.

Glutamine

Glutamine maintains and repairs the intestinal wall, builds and maintains muscle and also reduces cravings for sugar and alcohol.

Gelatine

Gelatine comes from the breakdown of the collagen in the bones and it protects and soothes the lining of the digestive tract. It is especially useful in healing IBS, Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis and reflux, and gelatine does this by reducing the inflammation to the gut lining.

Overall, bone broth is great for people with lots of food allergies and intolerance as it is unlikely to cause a reaction in the body and it will bring immediate relief to an inflamed digestive system.

Recipes for Bone Broth (beef and chicken)

Beef Stock

  • 2.5 kg beef bones.
  • 1 brown onion (quartered with skin on).
  • 5 chopped carrots (if organic leave skin on).
  • 3 celery stalks, roughly chopped.
  • 3 bay leaves.
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar (this leeches minerals, amino acid and collagen from the bones).
  • Enough water to just cover bones.

Method: You can brown the bones in the oven first for 10-15 minutes for added flavour. Simmer over a very low heat for 8-72 hrs topping-up with water if needed and skimming-off froth which comes to the top. After desired time, strain stock and discard the solids. Then place in fridge overnight and skim the excess fat off and place into containers suitable for freezing.

Chicken Stock

  • 3-4 organic or free range chicken carcasses or bones from left over (chickens raw or cooked).
  • 3 carrots (if organic leave skin on).
  • 3 stems of celery, roughly chopped.
  • 3 Bay leaves.
  • Handful of parsley.
  • 2 sage leaves.
  • Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning.
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar (with the Mother in it).

Method: Add all ingredients to a large stock pot and add enough water to cover. Cook for at least 4-hours. Skim the top as froth rises. Strain and discard solids and refrigerate overnight. Skim fat and pour into containers to freeze.

About Our Digestive News and Review Columnist – Ange Sinclair

AngeAnge Sinclair, founder of Digestive Detective is a Naturopath, Nutritionist and Herbalist. She has a special interest in Digestive Disorders. She helps you beat the bloat, purge your pain and find the root cause of your problem using nutrition, herbal medicine and supplements.

Visit Ange’s website to take her quiz to see if you are ready to change your health, or connect on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.

Disclaimer: The information published in this column are based on each of the author’s own professional and personal knowledge, and opinion. This information and opinion is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment of any manner. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding any medical condition and consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on InShape News.

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